Skip to main content
The views expressed in this content represent the perspective and opinions of the author and may or may not represent the position of Indiana University School of Medicine.
Default Author Avatar IUSM Logo
Author

IU School of Medicine

IU School of Medicine is the largest medical school in the U.S. and is annually ranked among the top medical schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. The school offers high-quality medical education, access to leading medical research and rich campus life in nine Indiana cities, including rural and urban locations consistently recognized for livability.

Showing results for IU School of Medicine

IU School of Medicine's 2023 NIH funding ranked No. 13 among public universities

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers received over $243 million in total funding from the National Institutes of Health during federal fiscal year 2023 — a more than $54 million increase over the past five years, or 28%.

IU School of Medicine  |  Feb 20, 2024

$3.4 million grant to fund research on brain bleeding, swelling that occurs in quarter of patients who receive Alzheimer’s disease treatments

With the emergence of promising treatments that slow the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease in patients, there are still questions surrounding side effects of the drugs. An Indiana University School of Medicine researcher is among the few neuroscientists investigating these adverse events, which can cause brain swelling and brain bleeding.

IU School of Medicine  |  Feb 14, 2024

Blood test predicts psychosis risk, most effective treatments

A team of researchers led by Indiana University School of Medicine faculty have developed a breakthrough new blood test for schizophrenia, a psychiatric disorder that includes hallucinations and delusions.

IU School of Medicine  |  Feb 08, 2024

Cancer researcher Craig B. Thompson named 2024 Watanabe Prize winner

Pioneering cancer researcher Craig B. Thompson, MD, has been named the 2024 winner of the August M. Watanabe Prize in Translational Research.

IU School of Medicine  |  Feb 07, 2024

IU surgeon-scientist studying physiological effect of microorganisms in sinuses of chronic rhinosinusitis patients

An Indiana University School of Medicine surgeon-scientist is leading a multi-institutional grant investigating the role of the sinus microbiome in chronic rhinosinusitis, an inflammatory disease that causes the lining of the sinuses to swell.

IU School of Medicine  |  Feb 01, 2024

New research aims to develop novel therapeutic for glaucoma

INDIANAPOLIS—Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine are using a novel approach to hopefully develop a new therapy for glaucoma, a complex disease that eventually leads to blindness, thanks to a new five-year, $2 million R01 grant from the National Eye Institute.

IU School of Medicine  |  Jan 04, 2024

Beta blocker used to treat heart problems and other medical concerns could be new treatment for sickle cell cardiomyopathy

A beta blocker typically used to treat heart problems, hemangioma, migraines and anxiety could be a new therapeutic for patients with sickle cell disease.

IU School of Medicine  |  Jan 03, 2024

IU School of Medicine names new chair to lead Department of Neurological Surgery

Indiana University School of Medicine has named a nationally-recognized neurosurgeon and one of its longtime faculty leaders as the next chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery.

IU School of Medicine  |  Dec 08, 2023

Protein found in brain linked to frontotemporal dementia

An international team of researchers including experts at the Indiana University School of Medicine has identified a protein found in the brains of people with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), discovering a new target for potential treatments for the disease.

IU School of Medicine  |  Dec 07, 2023

Researchers reveal uncharted liver-focused pathway in gene therapy immune responses

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have uncovered vital insights regarding a liver trigger that blocks an undesired immune response from gene therapy, surprisingly resulting in the activation of specific immune cells, despite the liver's typical role in suppressing immune responses. The findings, published in Molecular Therapy, may pave the way for change in immunomodulation strategies for desired and long-lasting effects of gene therapy.

IU School of Medicine  |  Dec 07, 2023